Monthly Archive: January 2015

Starred Publishers Weekly Review

Publishers Weekly reviewed The Only Ones, singling the book out for a “starred” review:

Dibbell’s debut novel chillingly imagines the world in the wake of a global pandemic in the latter part of the 21st century, when much of the population has been wiped out by a potent combination of viruses and bacterial infections that includes tuberculosis, polio, and Ebola. The reader views this apocalyptic abyss through the eyes of Inez Kissena Fardo, a young woman from Queens, N.Y., who has never known a normal existence — she has never even seen a baby. Reproductive ability has been annihilated, and fetuses are made in a lab. Instead of parents there are “clients”; mothers have become “hosts,” and fathers are now “male product.” Inez, who is immune to infection, becomes part of Rauden Sach’s team of baby makers for paying customers. When other methods fail, Rauden resorts to cloning her, and complications ensue. The futuristic trials of motherhood are eerily familiar; Inez spends her days rushing from one low-wage job to the next to pay for her daughter’s schooling, clothes, and the things she needs to keep up with her friends. The book illuminates present-day paranoias, but it is further elevated by Dibbell’s trenchant attention to the corrosive nature of social and economic inequality. (Mar.)

Dazed & Confused

Carola Dibbell’s novel The Only Ones was cited in Dazed & Confused‘s Who should you be reading in 2015?:

Carola Dibbell’s 2015 novel The Only Ones looks utterly thrilling — another ace title from Two Dollar Radio. Inez, the protagonist, is immune to disease in a world ravaged by illness. Her reproductive abilities are harnessed for commercial purposes, but things, inevitably, go weird and wrong.

BuzzFeed’s 27 Most Exciting New Books of 2015

BuzzFeed staff writer Jarry Lee included Carola Dibbell’s novel, The Only Ones, in her 27 Of The Most Exciting New Books Of 2015:

Carola Dibbell’s The Only Ones introduces a post-pandemic world where a woman immune to the disease, Inez, makes her living as a test subject. When a mother backs out on experimental genetic research, Inez is left responsible for her baby girl, who is a scientific breakthrough, and must protect her from both religious fanatics and the authorities.